Tag Archives: time

What is DAP?

There’s an old Jewish parable that says if you have 10 Rabbis in a room, you get 11 different opinions. I believe the same is true about early childhood educators and Developmentally Appropriate Practice (DAP). If you ask 10 early childhood educators to define DAP, you’ll probably get 11 different answers.

What is DAP? In it’s simplest form DAP is

  • identifying each child’s developmental level
  • providing experiences that help each child blossom

There are many more detailed and complex descriptions of DAP, but the basics are the same.

Each child has their own developmental journey. As educators, our goal should be to help each child be successful on their journey. Finding the right teaching strategies to support each child’s journey is part of the process. Our challenge is recognizing that a strategy that worked for one child may not work for a different child. Or, strategies that are successful in one setting are not successful in a different setting.

What qualifies as a DAP experience?

  • open-ended
  • everyone can be successful
  • multiple entry points (all children can participate in a way that is comfortable for them)
  • hands-on
  • interesting to the child(ren)
  • active and engaging
  • captures a child’s attention

DAP experiences also include these elements:

  • choices for children
  • opportunities to build language skills
  • opportunities to develop social skills
  • creativity and problem solving

But, I would say that one of the most important elements of DAP is

time

TIME

Children need TIME to play. Children need to TIME to explore. Children need TIME to create and explore and build and take apart. Children need uninterrupted TIME to test out their own theories of how things work. Children need uninterrupted TIME to discover new ideas and explore new materials.  Children need uninterrupted TIME to build relationships with others, both peers and caregivers. Children need uninterrupted TIME to practice new skills and share their ideas. But most of all, children need uninterrupted TIME to just BE!

Let me know your thoughts on DAP. How do you define DAP? Would you add or change any of the elements I’ve listed? What do you consider to be the most important element of DAP? Is it TIME, or is it something else?

The Wonder of Being Two

Imagine what it would be like to see a creepy, crawly caterpillar for the very first time. You notice it’s striped colors, and how it’s inching its way along on a piece of grass.

caterpillar

Can you find the creepy, crawly caterpillar?

If you were noticing this caterpillar for the very first time, what thoughts might be going through your head?

  • Would you stop and spend some time watching to see where it goes and how it moves?
  • Would you want to immediately reach out and touch it, maybe holding it a little too tightly (oops!)?
  • Would you turn and run the other way the moment the caterpillar begins to move ( a scream might escape your lips, a tear from your eye)?
  • Would you wonder how it tastes?

If you’re two, you might do all of those things.

For a two year old, the world is filled with wonder. So many sights, sounds and experiences are brand new. What we as adults take for granted and think of as familiar is utterly fascinating to a two year old.

The senses of a two year old are constantly firing. Their minds are always wondering:

  • How does it feel?
  • What does it taste like?
  • What can I DO with this?

Some moments, the concentration of a two year old is endless. Other moments, their concentration is fleeting.

But in order to answer all of those questions floating around in the mind of a two year old, we need to provide multiple opportunities for them to explore and discover the same materials over and over again.

As caregivers, the best gift we can give to a two year old is time. Time to explore, time to discover. Time to make a mess. Time to sit and watch. Time to play. Time to be together with our full attention. Time to just be.

It takes time to wonder. There is no rushing the magic of new discoveries.